When it Comes to Your Career, Stop Complaining About What’s Unfair

Over the years I’ve worked with many artists and leaders who are frustrated because of the attention someone similar to them receives. Perhaps the other person got a better book deal, or has a more successful TV show. Perhaps their nonprofit organization raises more money – even though it’s work isn’t as important. The truth is – many times these clients are right. The world isn’t fair. Books that aren’t very good often reach the bestseller lists. There are some horrible TV programs that generate a lot of support. Bad movies often do well at the box office. Whatever the case, I can sympathize with their frustration that others are doing better. My advice?

Get over it. Life isn’t fair. So what? If you really want to make a leap forward in your career, stop wasting your time complaining about other people. I’ll be in my grave before I understand why people watch some TV programs, buy books, or pick organizations to support. Who knows? We’re just called to keep moving forward and do what we do.

Mother Teresa said that we’re not called to be successful, we’re called to be faithful. Being frustrated about the success of rivals or anyone else only holds you back. Stick with the plan. Do what you can do. Be faithful.

Let me know if you’ve been struggling with that…..

 

This entry was posted on Wednesday, December 5th, 2012 at 7:46 pm and is filed under General. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

  • dave

    I do! alot of people in my work area are equal or of lesser talent, but they get the cool projects or their idea is better recieved than mine is…. This has been very humbling for me. Very good article

  • Sharon Sarles

    Okay,sure comparing ourselves, fine. However, doing superior work in a corner, never connecting with many people seems like a waste. I had hoped that you would be able to teach me how to better connect. I can be a great content producer. Must I be omni-competent? Know all tech? Be a master of all marketing? Must I pander to the masses, thereby undercutting what I can really do? Is there a way out of the corner?

    • http://twitter.com/PhilCooke Phil Cooke

      I think you may be looking for a different post Sharon. But I do feel your pain, and I’ll do my best to address your issue sometime soon.

    • http://twitter.com/PhilCooke Phil Cooke

      One more thing Sharon – the answer to your question is in my book “One Big Thing.” No – you don’t have to master everything. Just be exceptional at One Big Thing.