Posts Tagged ‘TV’



When It Comes to Media, It’s Time To Get Real

Just when we hoped “reality” programming was reaching it’s end, we discovered that the audience ratings are higher than ever. Now, reality advertising is the next step as the trend in reality programming has trickled down into the commercials that surround the programs. Certainly, as a commercial director, I’ve seen a strong increase in clients wanting to portray real people instead of actors, less gloss and hype, and more “real life” situations in spots.  Here are some thoughts and ideas as you brainstorm your next advertising campaign:
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In the Morning – Turn Off the TV and Open Your Mind

Typically, I get up early and head to the gym. When I get back to the house, I read the paper and then shower and get dressed for the day.  For years, during that time I turned on the TV and watched the morning news.  But a few months ago I decided to skip the TV news and just get dressed in silence. Guess what? Read the full article »

Who Exactly Is Your Audience?

In one chapter of the fascinating new book by Frank Viola and Leonard Sweet - “Jesus: A Theography,” they raise some interesting points concerning Jesus’ audience. Even though He engaged the Rabbis on a regular basis, they make it clear His main audience wasn’t religious leaders. He wasn’t trying to persuade or convert the Jewish establishment because they didn’t respect his credentials or authority. Jesus focused on the common people. That’s why he spent so much time in villages, rather than the major towns of the region.  In fact, Viola and Sweet point out that Read the full article »

The Questions To Ask About Lance Armstrong

The reactions to the Lance Armstrong interviews on Oprah were pretty one sided.  Most people seemed to think he was holding back, offering excuses, or not being completely contrite.  When I watched the interviews, I wasn’t thinking about forgiveness, I was thinking about trust – and how to rebuild it.  So when Fox News asked me to write an essay on my reactions to the interview, I asked some different questions.  They published it here on FoxNews.com, so please share it, and then I would love to hear your reactions.   Read the full article »

A Great Idea for Getting News Coverage

Here’s one of the most effective ways to get noticed by local media and generate positive press coverage:  Take a reporter out to lunch.  That’s right. Simple as that. Chances are in your town, you have newspaper, radio, or TV reporters who cover the subject you’re involved in. If you’re a pastor or ministry leader, someone’s covering the religious beat. If you’re a musician, writer, or artist, some reporter is covering the culture, media, or entertainment beat. There’s business and sports sections in every local paper. Whatever you do for a living, chances are, the local news outlets are covering it. We spend endless hours complaining that we don’t get coverage for our new album, movie, ministry outreach, product launch, or whatever – when the truth is, Read the full article »

Ten Things I Wish Someone Had Told Me In College

College was a wonderful experience for me.  It literally transformed my life.  In those days, I was a film and television major, but I’m sad to say, that was the only area my university failed me.  Professors teach you knowledge about your field, but they don’t often teach about the relational or practical issues of your field.  So after more than three decades working as a professional in the media, and living out what I majored in college, here’s the ten things I wish I’d known back then that would have made a dramatic difference in my career: Read the full article »

How to Respond to Creatives

I received this note from a friend recently: “I’d love to see you comment on how to give feedback to creative types. I just had a client give me an hour to write a script with no direction. Two days later, I heard that it was “terrible and to rewrite it.” My friend’s note hit home, because I’ve certainly worked for difficult clients. Nothing could be more counter productive to getting creative results than slapping down your writer, designer, media director, or other creative staff member.  How should you respond?  If you know someone having trouble supervising creative employees, pass these tips along:
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Managing Creative People: Are They a Little Crazy?

Everyone loves what creative people do, but many find their lifestyles and behavior a little strange.  Just hire an advertising agency, or glance at MTV to confirm that there are some pretty odd creative people out there.  But for the organizations to reach their real potential, we have to learn to maximize our creativity, and cultivate our relationships with original thinkers.  There’s no question that creative people are wired differently.  Their perception of the world, their reactions to events, and even the way they sleep is often dramatically different from most.  Therefore, much of  Read the full article »

It’s Time to Shut Up and Make a Decision

I think Yogi Berra had it right when he said: “If you come to a fork in the road, take it.” Lately I seem to be surrounded with leaders who can’t make decisions. The executive director of a major nonprofit told me recently, “When I make a decision, I feel guilty.” In some cases, leaders who shy away from decisions make the horrible error of farming decisions out to a committee. How many churches, nonprofits, and businesses today are run by “leadership teams,” or “marketing teams?” Teams are great for brainstorming and executing strategy, but at some point, one person needs to make a choice. As I’ve said before – in military terms – Read the full article »

Where’s the Place That Inspires You?

For most people, geography impacts inspiration. There are extraordinary places on the planet that spark our imaginations and light up our creativity. The problem is, most people never think about “location” when it comes to creativity.  Trust me – high performing creative people know the places that inspire them. For novelist Stephen King, it’s Durham, Maine, where he grew up in the 60’s. For poet Langston Hughes, it was the jazz clubs of Harlem. For Toy Inventor A.C. Gilbert, it’s the train line in Connecticut.  For me, it’s the area around  Read the full article »


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