Posts Tagged ‘pitch’



How Well Does Your Idea Resonate?

The dictionary definition of “resonance” is: “Vibration caused by a relatively small stimulus, the intensification and enriching of a musical tone by supplementary vibration, or a quality of evoking response.”   When it comes to your ideas – do they create a vibration in the room?  Do they cause a response?  Too often, when we share or pitch our ideas, nothing happens. Then we tell ourselves that Read the full article »

Is Pitching Your Dream Project Making You A Jerk?

Someone pitched me a project the other day. He had obviously worked very hard on it and was very passionate. But he made one serious mistake: He let his passion spill over into annoyance and then arrogance.  After giving me a long speech about his credentials, and why his experience justified me listening to the project, he then went into a diatribe about what was wrong with people in Hollywood and why they haven’t responded to him. I understood his frustration, because after all, I’ve been out here for Read the full article »

Is Your Big Idea Easy to Understand?

People come to share their “big idea” with me all the time. They’re excited, pumped, and can’t wait to tell me their great idea for a movie, a nonprofit organization, a book, a new product, or company.  The problem is, it takes forever. Try as they might, they just can’t explain their big idea in a short, simple conversation. For some reason they feel obligated to tell me the history, the background, the competition, the mistakes, the failed tries, the alternatives, what other people think, and Read the full article »

Media People: Stop Using “Compilation” Reels to Showcase Your Work

OK – producers, directors, editors, camera people, and everyone else in the film, TV, or media business. Stop producing demo reels of compiled shots of your work edited to a hip, cool song. I’m not impressed, and here’s why: Read the full article »

The Truth About Demo Reels

Let me set the record straight about “demo reels” because I’m tired of seeing the wrong thing.  Filmmakers pay attention.  Here’s what producers are looking for:

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