Posts Tagged ‘ministry’



Mind Blowing Facts About People Over 50

This video by the Type A Group makes you wonder why organizations spend so much time, effort, and money reaching out to younger audiences.  These numbers are pretty compelling and particularly in the case of nonprofits, churches, and ministries, make you realize that if you’re not connecting with older audiences, you’re making a fatal mistake: Read the full article »

Should Churches Hold “Oscar Parties?”

Last night Kathleen and I attended the Oscar party at Bel Air Presbyterian Church in Los Angeles. Beacon is Bel Air’s ministry to the entertainment and media industries, and they partnered with the Hollywood Prayer Network, The Greenhouse, The 168 Film Project, and Christian Women in Media to host the event. More than 1,000 people showed up to see the Oscars, discuss the films, and have a really fun night. We even had a huge contest to see who could predict the winners. The question is – Why should churches host Oscar parties? Read the full article »

What Are Your Nonprofit Donors Looking For?

Today – on Valentine’s Day, I asked donor development expert Mary Hutchinson about advice on “courting” donors for nonprofit organizations.  Here’s what she had to say:

For the most part, they are silent and faceless, but the people who give to your non-profit—dare I say it—do indeed have feelings.  Yes, that pesky little thing that most men hate to talk about, and most women need stroked to move them to any decision. And face it, men may have most of the money, but it is women that make the lion share of decisions about giving. Not only that, but Read the full article »

Your Ideas Won’t Happen with Someone Else’s Team

I’m pulling this post from the archives because I was reading Matthew 9:16 about putting new wine into old wineskins or sewing un-shrunk cloth on an old garment.  In Biblical days wine was kept in a leather bag or “skin,” because it could stretch as the wine aged.  But once it got old, the bag locked into it’s shape and lost the ability to stretch.  The concept is particularly important when it comes to leadership.  A few years ago I was asked to consult with a major ministry that had been on the national scene for a long time.  Now, a new leader wanted to bring it up to date – make it more contemporary, fresh, and relevant.  But the first thing I noticed was
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Interior Design for Churches – Check Out The Local Anthropologie Store

This is a re-post from a few years back when my wife Kathleen noticed an interesting interview with Ron Pompei from the popular women’s store “Antropologie” in a supplement to Time magazine. As I read about his philosophy of store design, it clicked that we should be thinking this way when it comes to how people experience “church.” In the past, a church was an artistic expression of the community, and from small chapels in the woods, to magnificant cathedrals in major cities, houses of worship reflected meaning. From the overall design, to the smallest details, they told the story of Read the full article »

Who Exactly Is Your Audience?

In one chapter of the fascinating new book by Frank Viola and Leonard Sweet - “Jesus: A Theography,” they raise some interesting points concerning Jesus’ audience. Even though He engaged the Rabbis on a regular basis, they make it clear His main audience wasn’t religious leaders. He wasn’t trying to persuade or convert the Jewish establishment because they didn’t respect his credentials or authority. Jesus focused on the common people. That’s why he spent so much time in villages, rather than the major towns of the region.  In fact, Viola and Sweet point out that Read the full article »

Leaders: Cutting Back Can Make You More Successful

In consulting with nonprofit organizations around the world, our team at Cooke Pictures has discovered that the most successful are deep, not wide.  In other words, they know how to focus on one big thing, instead of trying to do many things badly.  In this video I talk about why it matters, and how being lean and mean can make a huge difference.  If you know a leader of a bloated or ineffective organization, make sure he or she sees this:  Read the full article »

This is the Age of Nimble

Bureaucracy is dead. This is the age of “nimble.” Trust me on this – if your organization has silos, turf battles, or is overwhelmed by policy manuals, you’re about to get squashed by smaller, nimbler, and hungrier organizations. You see bureaucracy everywhere today – the government can’t even pass a budget because of the number of special interests they have to please. Hostess, the maker of Twinkies is out of business because among other things, their Union rules required cake and bread to travel in separate trucks, and barred drivers from loading and unloading. Nimbler firms were Read the full article »

Tips for Reverse Church Growth

This is a great reminder for pastors and church leaders, so I brought this post back from the archives.  A few years ago, my friend, Broadway actor Fred Applegate, sent me these sure-fire tips for REVERSE church growth after traveling around the country and visiting quite a few houses of worship:

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Making Leadership Transitions Work

While writing my book “Unique:  Telling Your Story in the Age of Brands and Social Media,” I discovered that far too many businesses and nonprofits struggle with leadership transitions, especially moving from founders to what I call “second generation” leadership.  Whatever transition you’re in (or see coming up), this short video is worth watching.  The stakes are too high to fail:

 


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