Posts Tagged ‘media’



It’s Time to Point With the Sword of Truth Instead of Chopping

One of my favorite quotes is from writer Anne Lamott: “You don’t always have to chop with the sword of truth, you can point with it too.” In the age of the internet, most of us do a lot of chopping and not enough pointing. In the best instances, we’re upset and trying to right a wrong, and in the worst instances, Internet anonymity has created vicious critics and quite a few crazy loons. Either way, I think Read the full article »

Research on TV Viewing That May Shock You

It’s widely believed that in the digital age, television is dead. But as with many rumors, nothing could be further from the truth. That lesson is supported by recent research from Nielsen Ratings. Plus, you’ll be surprised at who’s watching TV versus spending time online. Here’s some of the findings: Read the full article »

How People Discover New TV Shows

In the digital age, there’s plenty of controversy about traditional advertising versus digital advertising and social media (not to mention guerrilla advertising.) But a recent survey from HUB Entertainment Research reveals the truth about how people find new TV programs. The results may be surprising: Read the full article »

3 Important Things I Learned About Creativity from Fishing in Key West

I went deep sea fishing in Key West today. I’m speaking at a Christian Vision global conference at Duck Key, and a few of us went out on a fishing boat early in the morning. While you’re out there waiting on the fish to bite, you have a lot of time to think, so naturally, I started thinking about creativity, influence, and producing media programming that impacts audiences. Here’s 3 thoughts that came to me while I was waiting for that awesome fish in the photo: Read the full article »

How People Watch TV in a Multiscreen Era

Recently, Variety Magazine highlighted a study by Strategy Analytics that attempted to understand how people view television in the multiscreen era. I’ve written before that television is alive and well, and shouldn’t be written off in the age of the Internet. But there’s no question, the way people view programming is changing. Overall, when it comes to viewing habits these days, here’s the breakdown: Read the full article »

Seth Godin’s Advice on Nit-Pickers: Pastors and Leaders Need to Read This

My friend Seth Godin wasn’t writing this for pastors, but when I read it, I realized pastors were exactly the right audience for this piece. Read it through and let me know if you agree. And perhaps more important – if you’ve ever experienced one or more of these types of folks in your church or ministry: Read the full article »

Who’s Creating The Movies and TV Programs That Will Inspire The Next Generation?

This past week I had two interesting experiences. First – it was the 100 year anniversary of the birth of Clayton Moore – who played “The Lone Ranger” on television. The series originally aired on ABC from 1949-1957, and was the highest-rated television program on the network in the early 1950s and its first true “hit”. As a kid, I watched it as re-runs, and it was one of my favorite shows. As you may remember, The Lone Ranger lived by a code, and as a kid, I knew the code by heart. Last week, during the news reports of the anniversary, his daughter, Dawn Moore said something remarkable: Read the full article »

The Secret to Stopping Unwanted Speculation and Rumor

Whenever a crisis happens at an organization, rumors begin. We shouldn’t be surprised because human beings are wired for curiosity. We want to know what happened, what’s going on, and what’s next. Channeled in the right direction, curiosity creates inventions, cures disease, and births great art.  But channeled in the wrong direction, curiosity can destroy reputations, throw organizations into chaos, and undermine the common good. But there’s one way to stop unwanted speculation and rumor in it’s tracks: Read the full article »

The Sweet Spot of Sharing the Christian Message

We’re seeing a lot of criticism recently of pastors, writers, speakers, filmmakers as well as others about how they share the Christian message with the outside culture. Some are criticized for making it too easy – they lead with the “grace” message, and are hesitant to talk about tough issues like sin, hell, or punishment. On the other side, those who preach a more serious message about tough subjects are labelled as “out of date,” “insensitive” and “hard core.” I know the debate well because over the years, I’ve had friends and clients on both sides of the argument. But here’s the problem: It’s the wrong argument, and here’s why: Read the full article »


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