Posts Tagged ‘management’



A Real Life Example of Why Culture is More Important Than Vision

Culture is more important than vision.  From experts like John Maxwell to Sam Chand, that premise is a critical leadership principle. The reason is simple: An organization’s culture sets the tone for everything else, and leaders are responsible for creating an organization’s culture. I don’t care how great or noble your vision – if you don’t have a capable and vibrant culture, then very little will happen. A strong culture inspires people, and Read the full article »

People You Fire: How Are They Doing Now?

There are a few ministry organizations in the country who’s list of people that have been fired is like a “who’s who” of great leaders. It seems like when talented employees start rising, the CEO of some organizations start getting nervous, and before long finds a reason to let them go. Stop for a minute and think about people you’ve fired over the years. Where Read the full article »

Why You Should Master the Art of the Apology

Saturday night Kathleen and I “pre-celebrated” Mother’s Day at a nice Italian restaurant with our daughter Kelsey. Kelsey’s husband Chris is on the national Broadway tour of “Sister Act” and our other daughter Bailey lives in New York City so it was just us three. We were on our way to attend the screening of a new situation comedy produced by a friend, so we made early dinner reservations. As a result, we were the first people to be seated, and that’s when the trouble began. We ordered, and then Read the full article »

Target CEO Resigns: Leaders Are Responsible Even When Things Aren’t Their Fault

The CEO of Target resigned last week amid the furor over the data breach that jeopardized 40 million payment card accounts since the Black Friday shopping weekend. Gregg Steinhafel had been at Target for 35 years and has been a respected leader through some challenging times. But with the data breach issue dragging on, and impacting stock prices, he finally stepped aside.  The truth is Read the full article »

How To Leave Your Job Well

In past generations, people were employed for life, but statistics indicate that in today’s economy, you’ll have many jobs before retirement. In most areas – advertising and marketing, ministry, nonprofit work, entertainment, business, etc… the world is pretty small, so when it comes time to leave your job, you’d better leave it on good terms. After all, you never know in the future when you might want to work with that organization again. So even when you leave out of anger, duress, frustration, or most other reasons, I always encourage people not to burn bridges. But even when that’s your intention, most people don’t do it well, so here’s a few reminders you should keep tucked away for that day when it’s time to move on: Read the full article »

10 Important Tips For Leaders

Writer Fay Vincent shared 10 Tips for New Executives in the Wall Street Journal recently. While they were designed for new CEO’s taking over high profile positions, when I looked at the list I realized that these were powerful insights that every leader needs to consider. I’d encourage you to read the entire article, but for a brief synopsis, here’s the 10 tips: Read the full article »

Stop Giving Advice to People Who Don’t Ask For It

I’m embarrassed to say that it’s taken me most of my life to understand this, but it’s true. Except in very rare situations, giving people advice who haven’t asked for it just doesn’t work – no matter how noble your intentions. In fact, they will often be offended and your very relationship can be damaged. When my daughters were growing up I would see them making a mistake and offer my advice. Did they take it? Rarely. More often than not, they were offended. My wife Kathleen was the same way. Unsolicited advice almost always seems judgmental and is therefore unappreciated. So after a lot of fiery darts being flung my way, here’s a few things I’ve learned: Read the full article »

To Execute Ideas Successfully, Leaders Must Believe

When it comes to executing well, employees and team members must believe the leader is 100% behind the mission. That principle is in the news today in a big way after the release of Robert Gates’ new memoir of his time as Secretary of Defense. One of his claims is the President was never really behind the mission in Afghanistan, and how much that hurt the morale of our men and women on the front lines. It continues with the President’s recent “reforms” of the NSA’s surveillance program. You may like the program or you may not. But Read the full article »

Leaders: What To Do When a Crisis Happens

Rarely a week goes by that you don’t see a public relations nightmare happening at a local church, ministry, or nonprofit. From a leader’s moral failing, to financial improprieties, to inappropriate sexual relationships, there are many ways a crisis can damage or destroy an otherwise great organization. And sometimes a crisis happens that’s not even your fault. That’s why I asked Kathy Lovin, who does a brilliant job managing Public Affairs and Communications for The Salvation Army USA Western Territory for some coaching on handling a crisis. Here’s her excellent advice: Read the full article »

Why You’re Not Getting a Job in the Entertainment Industry (Or Anywhere Else)

Sometimes it seems like in the last three decades I’ve read a million different resumes, and interviewed about as many people looking for jobs. After all that experience, one big thing bugs me, and I think it’s holding a lot of people back from getting better jobs: The lack of a specific skill.  Here’s the situation: Read the full article »


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