Posts Tagged ‘management’



How To Leave Your Job Well

In past generations, people were employed for life, but statistics indicate that in today’s economy, you’ll have many jobs before retirement. In most areas – advertising and marketing, ministry, nonprofit work, entertainment, business, etc… the world is pretty small, so when it comes time to leave your job, you’d better leave it on good terms. After all, you never know in the future when you might want to work with that organization again. So even when you leave out of anger, duress, frustration, or most other reasons, I always encourage people not to burn bridges. But even when that’s your intention, most people don’t do it well, so here’s a few reminders you should keep tucked away for that day when it’s time to move on: Read the full article »

10 Important Tips For Leaders

Writer Fay Vincent shared 10 Tips for New Executives in the Wall Street Journal recently. While they were designed for new CEO’s taking over high profile positions, when I looked at the list I realized that these were powerful insights that every leader needs to consider. I’d encourage you to read the entire article, but for a brief synopsis, here’s the 10 tips: Read the full article »

Stop Giving Advice to People Who Don’t Ask For It

I’m embarrassed to say that it’s taken me most of my life to understand this, but it’s true. Except in very rare situations, giving people advice who haven’t asked for it just doesn’t work – no matter how noble your intentions. In fact, they will often be offended and your very relationship can be damaged. When my daughters were growing up I would see them making a mistake and offer my advice. Did they take it? Rarely. More often than not, they were offended. My wife Kathleen was the same way. Unsolicited advice almost always seems judgmental and is therefore unappreciated. So after a lot of fiery darts being flung my way, here’s a few things I’ve learned: Read the full article »

To Execute Ideas Successfully, Leaders Must Believe

When it comes to executing well, employees and team members must believe the leader is 100% behind the mission. That principle is in the news today in a big way after the release of Robert Gates’ new memoir of his time as Secretary of Defense. One of his claims is the President was never really behind the mission in Afghanistan, and how much that hurt the morale of our men and women on the front lines. It continues with the President’s recent “reforms” of the NSA’s surveillance program. You may like the program or you may not. But Read the full article »

Leaders: What To Do When a Crisis Happens

Rarely a week goes by that you don’t see a public relations nightmare happening at a local church, ministry, or nonprofit. From a leader’s moral failing, to financial improprieties, to inappropriate sexual relationships, there are many ways a crisis can damage or destroy an otherwise great organization. And sometimes a crisis happens that’s not even your fault. That’s why I asked Kathy Lovin, who does a brilliant job managing Public Affairs and Communications for The Salvation Army USA Western Territory for some coaching on handling a crisis. Here’s her excellent advice: Read the full article »

Why You’re Not Getting a Job in the Entertainment Industry (Or Anywhere Else)

Sometimes it seems like in the last three decades I’ve read a million different resumes, and interviewed about as many people looking for jobs. After all that experience, one big thing bugs me, and I think it’s holding a lot of people back from getting better jobs: The lack of a specific skill.  Here’s the situation: Read the full article »

What Leaders Should Learn from Chris Christie’s “Bridgegate”

Chris Christie may be finished as a presidential candidate, and maybe not. But either way, he experienced a potentially catastrophic event this past week with his now famous “Bridgegate” problems. While the vast majority of media critics and consultants agree that he’s handling the crisis very well so far (taking full responsibility, firing people at fault, having a 2 hour press conference to deal with questions), it certainly left him in a difficult position. It’s an instructional moment for leaders of all types for two reasons: Read the full article »

The Difference Between Promise and Performance

As we start 2014 focusing on execution, it’s good to remember that great execution means the difference between “promise” and “performance.”  The world is filled with promises from politicians, business leaders, teachers, even religious leaders. But when it comes to actual performance – as the TV commercials say, “results my vary.”  So how do we close the gap? How do we make sure we deliver on our promises? Here’s a few important keys to make it happen for you: Read the full article »

This Year, Find a Good Mentor in Your Office

In many ways, the most important advantage a person has in the workplace are relationships.  In the past, “networking” was about taking advantage – what other people can do for me.  But today, networking is about helping other people because it’s the right thing to do.  Whether you believe in God, Karma, or random chance, the truth is, when you help others achieve their dreams, they can help achieve yours.  But when it comes to the mentors and allies you have at work, here some important principles to remember: Read the full article »

My Most Popular Blog Posts of 2013

At the end of every year it’s fun (and educational) to see what the most widely read posts have been on my blog.  Take a look at the list and take a moment to read them yourself.  It’s always fascinating to see the areas people are most interested in.  Here’s the list:  Read the full article »


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