Posts Tagged ‘management’



Are You a Victim of Today’s Culture of Haste?

One of the great frustrations in organizations are leaders who’s enthusiasm to make a project happen overrides their patience. Great things take time, and it doesn’t help to push your team to the point of damaging the outcome.  In government, this administration has trouble with haste. Remember Nancy Pelosi who lectured Congress to pass Obamacare, and THEN we’ll see what’s in the bill.  Then, Read the full article »

My Surprising Suggestion for Starting The Week

I’m sure you’re facing a long to-do list right now, and this week there are probably many things to be done in your life and the life of your organization. But today, I’m recommending something a bit different – do nothing. That’s right. No work, no action, no check offs. Well, in a way at least. By doing “nothing” here’s what I mean: Read the full article »

Leaders: The Problem With Valuing Everyone Equally

The Bible is clear – everyone has intrinsic value and worth.  God loves us all and there are no favorites in His kingdom. As leaders, we try to live that out every day. The problem is, we get into trouble when we use that principle when evaluating our team. Every church, ministry, nonprofit, or business has employees or volunteers, and while we should appreciate them all equally, some of those employees bring greater value to the table. Throughout the Bible, God chose different people for Read the full article »

A Real Life Example of Why Culture is More Important Than Vision

Culture is more important than vision.  From experts like John Maxwell to Sam Chand, that premise is a critical leadership principle. The reason is simple: An organization’s culture sets the tone for everything else, and leaders are responsible for creating an organization’s culture. I don’t care how great or noble your vision – if you don’t have a capable and vibrant culture, then very little will happen. A strong culture inspires people, and Read the full article »

People You Fire: How Are They Doing Now?

There are a few ministry organizations in the country who’s list of people that have been fired is like a “who’s who” of great leaders. It seems like when talented employees start rising, the CEO of some organizations start getting nervous, and before long finds a reason to let them go. Stop for a minute and think about people you’ve fired over the years. Where Read the full article »

Why You Should Master the Art of the Apology

Saturday night Kathleen and I “pre-celebrated” Mother’s Day at a nice Italian restaurant with our daughter Kelsey. Kelsey’s husband Chris is on the national Broadway tour of “Sister Act” and our other daughter Bailey lives in New York City so it was just us three. We were on our way to attend the screening of a new situation comedy produced by a friend, so we made early dinner reservations. As a result, we were the first people to be seated, and that’s when the trouble began. We ordered, and then Read the full article »

Target CEO Resigns: Leaders Are Responsible Even When Things Aren’t Their Fault

The CEO of Target resigned last week amid the furor over the data breach that jeopardized 40 million payment card accounts since the Black Friday shopping weekend. Gregg Steinhafel had been at Target for 35 years and has been a respected leader through some challenging times. But with the data breach issue dragging on, and impacting stock prices, he finally stepped aside.  The truth is Read the full article »

How To Leave Your Job Well

In past generations, people were employed for life, but statistics indicate that in today’s economy, you’ll have many jobs before retirement. In most areas – advertising and marketing, ministry, nonprofit work, entertainment, business, etc… the world is pretty small, so when it comes time to leave your job, you’d better leave it on good terms. After all, you never know in the future when you might want to work with that organization again. So even when you leave out of anger, duress, frustration, or most other reasons, I always encourage people not to burn bridges. But even when that’s your intention, most people don’t do it well, so here’s a few reminders you should keep tucked away for that day when it’s time to move on: Read the full article »

10 Important Tips For Leaders

Writer Fay Vincent shared 10 Tips for New Executives in the Wall Street Journal recently. While they were designed for new CEO’s taking over high profile positions, when I looked at the list I realized that these were powerful insights that every leader needs to consider. I’d encourage you to read the entire article, but for a brief synopsis, here’s the 10 tips: Read the full article »

Stop Giving Advice to People Who Don’t Ask For It

I’m embarrassed to say that it’s taken me most of my life to understand this, but it’s true. Except in very rare situations, giving people advice who haven’t asked for it just doesn’t work – no matter how noble your intentions. In fact, they will often be offended and your very relationship can be damaged. When my daughters were growing up I would see them making a mistake and offer my advice. Did they take it? Rarely. More often than not, they were offended. My wife Kathleen was the same way. Unsolicited advice almost always seems judgmental and is therefore unappreciated. So after a lot of fiery darts being flung my way, here’s a few things I’ve learned: Read the full article »


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