Posts Tagged ‘manage’



Be Cautious When Hiring Your Family

Although nearly every church, ministry, or non-profit client I’ve ever known hires their family, I always urge caution when doing it.  Sure – there’s nothing we’d all like better than to hire our spouse, children, or other relatives.  The idea of a “family company” sounds great.  But in truth, it doesn’t work as well as you think.  Entrepreneur Guy Kawasaki is direct and too the point, but worth listening to when he says:  Read the full article »

The 5 People I’ll Never Hire Again

Working with our team at Cooke Pictures, I’ve produced hundreds of film and video projects over the years, and in the process hired thousands of people. I’ve worked on every continent, and about 50 countries. After all that experience hiring and sometimes firing, these are the five types of people – on a film set or in the office – I will never hire again: Read the full article »

Are You A Good Listener? Learn The Keys to “Selective Listening:”

Are you a good listener?  You’re not learning if you’re doing all the talking, and far too many people think they need to talk to get noticed.  So I asked the founder and CEO of Infinity Concepts, Mark Dreistadt, the secrets of listening well.  Have you ever been accused of “selective hearing?”  You know – the process that happens when you intentionally don’t want to hear something.  Well, there are actually five different ways we listen.  So here’s the 5 secrets to what Mark calls “Selective Listening” – how many have you experienced?

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This is the Age of Nimble

Bureaucracy is dead. This is the age of “nimble.” Trust me on this – if your organization has silos, turf battles, or is overwhelmed by policy manuals, you’re about to get squashed by smaller, nimbler, and hungrier organizations. You see bureaucracy everywhere today – the government can’t even pass a budget because of the number of special interests they have to please. Hostess, the maker of Twinkies is out of business because among other things, their Union rules required cake and bread to travel in separate trucks, and barred drivers from loading and unloading. Nimbler firms were Read the full article »

Making Leadership Transitions Work

While writing my book “Unique:  Telling Your Story in the Age of Brands and Social Media,” I discovered that far too many businesses and nonprofits struggle with leadership transitions, especially moving from founders to what I call “second generation” leadership.  Whatever transition you’re in (or see coming up), this short video is worth watching.  The stakes are too high to fail:

 

Washington Post Names “One Big Thing” to Top 5 Business Books of 2012

The Washington Post newspaper has named One Big Thing to it’s list of top five business books of 2012.  This is on the heels of being named to the top 10 business books in Austria.  It’s great when the business community sees the impact of a book that helps people discover their purpose.  Have you discovered yours?  Order your copy today of the book, audio book, or digital download, and in 2013 turn around your career and your life!   Read the full article »

Don’t Wait Until the Crisis Happens

Sir Jonathan Miller is a highly regarded theatrical director based in London, and while I was watching him work on a BBC documentary the other night, he said something brilliant:  “You learn to ice skate in the summertime.”  He mentioned it was a lesson his father taught him.  It took awhile for it to sink in, and then I realized the power of what he was really saying. Once the game, project, production, business, crisis – whatever starts, it’s too late to learn what to do. Take the classes, learn the techniques, get the knowledge before the crisis begins, or Read the full article »

Why Firing People Can Be a Good Thing

At the Nine’s Conference recently, I spoke on something churches, ministries, and nonprofit organizations really struggle with:  firing people.  Whether you’re a leader or employee, I’d encourage you to consider this perspective.  And as usual, let me know what you think.  Here’s the video:

 

The Damage Caused by Entrenched Incompetence

I had a depressing encounter the other day. After working a short time with an organization, it became pretty obvious that their inside public relations person was a disaster. She’d been at the organization a long time and had strong relationships with various leaders. She seemed decent enough with one exception: She was terrible at her job. I mean really terrible. Honestly, I asked a number of people she worked with, and not a single person could tell me anything she’d actually accomplished in the past few years. No PR strategy, no press releases, no social media campaigns, no media connections, nothing. So I asked the next obvious question: “Why doesn’t she get fired?” Read the full article »

How to Deal With Petty and Insecure People

It’s one thing to recognize petty and insecure people in your workplace, but something else entirely to learn how to deal with them. Early in my career I had the opportunity (yes -“opportunity”) to work for one, and it gave me an education into human behavior. It’s particularly challenging when your boss or client is petty and insecure, so particularly if that’s your situation, here’s a few tips about what to do: Read the full article »


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