Posts Tagged ‘human resources’



With Your Career, Are You An Amateur Or Professional?

At some point in our careers we need to decide how serious we are about the pursuit. As the old saying goes: “The thinking that got you into this mess isn’t the thinking you need to get out.”  All of us start as beginners or amateurs – and there’s no shame in that. But at some point, some decide that the pursuit is worth the self discipline it takes to reach the next level, while others decide to stay where they are. I could use a million examples – maybe you’re Read the full article »

When Hiring Your Family Is the Smart Thing To Do

When I wrote a recent post about nepotism, I received a lot of feedback – particularly on my Facebook page – from people defending hiring family members. It’s true that family-run businesses have a great track record. In my defense I did mention that I’m not 100% against hiring your children, plus I wrote that “In many cases, certain family members are doing excellent work.” In fact, I love it when my children help me in my own business. However, in retrospect, the post came off as Read the full article »

Be Cautious When Hiring Your Family

Although nearly every church, ministry, or non-profit client I’ve ever known hires their family, I always urge caution when doing it.  Sure – there’s nothing we’d all like better than to hire our spouse, children, or other relatives.  The idea of a “family company” sounds great.  But in truth, it doesn’t work as well as you think.  Entrepreneur Guy Kawasaki is direct and too the point, but worth listening to when he says:  Read the full article »

When Leaders Don’t Enjoy Spending Time With Their Team

In my consulting work over the last 30 years, one of the most common complaints I get – particularly at churches and nonprofit organizations – is that leaders don’t spend much time with their team.  Understand it’s not just about being busy. In most situations it’s pastors, executives, COO’s and other leaders who simply don’t enjoy spending time with their team. In case that’s happening at your organization, and since I’ve heard it from both sides, when it happens, here’s my advice for both parties: Read the full article »

Why Who You Work With Matters

Changing the organizational chart of an organization has a limited impact.  But changing where people sit, has a massive effect.  That’s from Ben Waber, CEO of Sociometric Solutions, who uses sensors to track communication patterns in the workplace.  He says a worker’s immediate neighbors account for 40-60% of interactions a worker faces during the workday.  If you’re two rows away, it’s reduced to 5-10%.  The fact is, Read the full article »

Three Signs It May Be Time To Find A New Job

My father’s generation valued job loyalty. It wasn’t unusual at all for employees – especially of large corporations – to spend their entire working life at one company. But today, that notion has been turned on it’s head. In fact, some research indicates a typical employee will work at as many as 15-20 different organizations in their career. In that world, it’s important to know when it’s time to leave – hopefully before you’re asked. If you’ve started staring out the windows in the afternoons, here’s a few indicators that it might be time to leave your job: Read the full article »

People You Fire: How Are They Doing Now?

There are a few ministry organizations in the country who’s list of people that have been fired is like a “who’s who” of great leaders. It seems like when talented employees start rising, the CEO of some organizations start getting nervous, and before long finds a reason to let them go. Stop for a minute and think about people you’ve fired over the years. Where Read the full article »

How To Leave Your Job Well

In past generations, people were employed for life, but statistics indicate that in today’s economy, you’ll have many jobs before retirement. In most areas – advertising and marketing, ministry, nonprofit work, entertainment, business, etc… the world is pretty small, so when it comes time to leave your job, you’d better leave it on good terms. After all, you never know in the future when you might want to work with that organization again. So even when you leave out of anger, duress, frustration, or most other reasons, I always encourage people not to burn bridges. But even when that’s your intention, most people don’t do it well, so here’s a few reminders you should keep tucked away for that day when it’s time to move on: Read the full article »

Why Your Boss Is The Key To Your Future

At some point or another, everyone has boss problems. I’ve worked for bosses who were the owner’s son or daughter, and were completely incompetent. There are fine leaders out there who are second generation, but in my career, I’ve worked for some real losers. I’ve had other bosses that were insecure, others who were egomaniacs, and still others who wanted to be somewhere else. As a result, sooner or later, most employees dream of Read the full article »

Shocking News About Complainers

You’d be surprised at how many times I start working with a new client, only to have someone on their team pull me aside to complain about how the organization is run, or the incompetent leadership, or the mission. I know other people who constantly complain about their job, co-workers, schedule, and more. The bottom line is that there are far too many people complaining and not nearly enough making things happen. Here’s a shocking statistic I read recently: Read the full article »


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