Posts Tagged ‘culture’



The Sweet Spot of Sharing the Christian Message

We’re seeing a lot of criticism recently of pastors, writers, speakers, filmmakers as well as others about how they share the Christian message with the outside culture. Some are criticized for making it too easy – they lead with the “grace” message, and are hesitant to talk about tough issues like sin, hell, or punishment. On the other side, those who preach a more serious message about tough subjects are labelled as “out of date,” “insensitive” and “hard core.” I know the debate well because over the years, I’ve had friends and clients on both sides of the argument. But here’s the problem: It’s the wrong argument, and here’s why: Read the full article »

Robin Williams Death And Why The World Thinks Christians Are Idiots

It’s already begun.  Just days after the tragic death of actor and comedian Robin Williams, Christians are coming up with the “answers,” and (surprise) pitching their DVD’s in the process. The most widely promoted so far is Robin Williams: The Sad Truth The Media Won’t Tell You from over at “Good Fight Ministries.” In the article it states: Read the full article »

How to Keep From Becoming A “One Hit Wonder” With Your Career

Living in Los Angeles, I’m constantly meeting people who had a breakthrough moment sometime in their career. Perhaps they acted in a successful TV series, wrote a screenplay for an acclaimed movie, or published a bestselling book. But after that success, they dropped off the radar, unable to keep the momentum going. Perhaps that’s happened to you. Your Read the full article »

Hollywood, Politics, and Religious Freedom in America

Every July 4th in America, we wrestle with how “patriotic” our church services and Christian programming should be. There is a massive shift in our thinking about mixing our religious faith and politics today, and recently, a magazine interviewed me on the issue. I thought you might be interested in the conversation: Read the full article »

On July 4th Sunday: Be Careful Using Militaristic Language in the Church

Something we invariably witness on July 4th Sunday is video on the wide screens at some churches featuring fighter jets, soldiers, and waving flags.  Yes – Jesus used militaristic language in the New Testament. As the Park Forum devotional puts it: “In a time when Galilee already had a powerful and dangerous ruler (Herod Antipas), Jesus was a revolutionary. When Jesus spoke of his purpose and mission, he often used war-like language. For example, in Matthew 10, he said, “Do not think that I have come to bring peace to the earth. I have not come to bring peace, but a sword.”” But what we can’t forget is Read the full article »

Christians And The Disneyfication of Great Art

Kathleen and I are teaching at a media conference in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Since we’re culture hounds, one night we went out to see a performance of the Tango. The dance was born during the 1890s along the Río de la Plata, the river between Uruguay and Argentina, and grew from there. The audience at the venue we attended was largely tourists – although we sat next to a group of very artistic older fans. In spite of all the tourist atmosphere, it was a fascinating performance, and as I watched, I thought of how many similar art forms were born out of poverty, war, or Read the full article »

A Real Life Example of Why Culture is More Important Than Vision

Culture is more important than vision.  From experts like John Maxwell to Sam Chand, that premise is a critical leadership principle. The reason is simple: An organization’s culture sets the tone for everything else, and leaders are responsible for creating an organization’s culture. I don’t care how great or noble your vision – if you don’t have a capable and vibrant culture, then very little will happen. A strong culture inspires people, and Read the full article »

The Future Of The Church

Recently, Steven Siwek and the team from Glory Unlimited did an interview with me on media, culture, and the future of the Church.   I’d love to know what you think:


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