Christian Leaders: Is it Time to Cool the Hype?

At different times in history, and for various reasons, Christian leaders have fallen victims to hype.   The dictionary defines “hype” as “extravagant promotion.” In other words – it’s usually a lie, even if our purpose is noble. Today, we’re in another massive “hype cycle.” How many times have you heard about some Christian book, teaching series, conference, or media program that it would “impact this generation,” “change the world,” or “shake nations?”  I believe one of the single biggest reasons the secular culture marginalizes Christianity is the hype factor. Remember that this generation is the most marketed to, pitched, branded, and advertised generation in history. They can smell a con a mile away. Do you really believe they’re buying into the fact that your latest sermon is going to “change a generation” or “shake the nations?”

Doubtful.

How about this idea:  What if we start re-building our credibility with a little realism? What if the world starts to realize that what we say is true? That how we describe our lives, ministries, churches, and impact is honest?

Who knows? They might even start believing what we’re teaching.

 

This entry was posted on Wednesday, July 24th, 2013 at 8:19 pm and is filed under General. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

14 Responses to “Christian Leaders: Is it Time to Cool the Hype?”

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  1. Joey Loman says:

    Hype seems to better motivate donations.

  2. jason_adams says:

    This is great.

  3. Todd Gale says:

    I hear this kind of thing all the time! Things like “This is the Year of Overflow!” or catchphrase preaching like “2013, Blessings like we’ve never seen!” If you see the word “Destiny” in any ad copy…run! I agree Phil, the best advertising is to build solid relationships built on trust and honesty.

  4. Simon Dillon says:

    This article is going to change a generation and shake nations…

  5. Ron_Sellers says:

    I’ve been hearing for 30 years now that “We’re entering a period of renewal!” Look around – does anything look particularly renewed to you? That kind of stuff is so arrogant (i.e. “I’m proclaiming it even if there’s no evidence of it”) , and increasingly, it just sounds desperate.

  6. [...] Phil Cooke is a media consultant focused mainly on the Christian market, as well as a vocal critic of contemporary American and American-influenced Christian culture. For the original article, visitphilcooke.com. [...]

  7. Bob Goyer says:

    While man strives to unite the Body of Christ and be the ministry that changes the world, the Holy Spirit is gently drawing followers of Jesus together. He is the ultimate “social media.” When will the Church begin to trust Jesus through the Holy Spirit to build His Church.

  8. [...] Phil Cooke is a media consultant focused mainly on the Christian market, as well as a vocal critic of contemporary American and American-influenced Christian culture. For the original article, visit philcooke.com. [...]

  9. [...] Phil Cooke is a media consultant focused mainly on the Christian market, as well as a vocal critic of contemporary American and American-influenced Christian culture. For the original article, visit philcooke.com. [...]

  10. […] Phil Cooke is a media consultant focused mainly on the Christian market, as well as a vocal critic of contemporary American and American-influenced Christian culture. For the original article, visitphilcooke.com. […]

  11. Cheryl Savage says:

    I agree about the hype..it is a form of dishonesty.
    I was singing and worshiping at a local church that proclaimed they were in Revival since they had gone to get it from The Lakeland Outpouring .
    I wanted a touch of revival !

    I felt so bad and i was wondering why i could not “enter in ” to worship and I just kept feeling so negative .

    The Lord showed me that i was feeling the grieving of Holy Spirit and that it was all HYPE.
    That church was not in revival..it was all hyped up emotionalism.

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