Does Your Product or Brand Influence Culture?

Brand expert Simon Williams says “Brands that influence culture sell more; culture is the new catalyst for growth.”  The concept of changing culture is hot.  Look at Google – it’s revolutionizing the way we work online – both personally and corporately.  There’s also a rush for brands to be green and help the environment.  Those brands are getting a lot of buzz right now.  Right or wrong, the perception of impacting culture adds an important layer to your credibility.  The perception is that PC’s are for bland business people, while Apple is for culture shapers and creators.

What are you doing to impact culture?  Whatever it is, you need to be talking about it.

 

This entry was posted on Thursday, October 4th, 2012 at 12:00 am and is filed under General. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

3 Responses to “Does Your Product or Brand Influence Culture?”

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  1. I am an antipodal apostle to the regular sort, with a four-year website production attempting to correct false doctrines of wayward Christian broadcast ministries.  It is called “In That Day Teachings,” or inthatdayteachings.com.  It happily heralds the day of Christ manifesting Himself in His saints, and explains in devastating, doctrinal detail just why conventional broadcast Christianity oft frustrates this effort of God and enlightened man.  Like teenage artist Akiane Kramaric, who creates exotic out-of-this-world paintings on a daily basis, I operate on the other side of the age and beauty scale as a sort-of-surprising curmudgeon who daily produces things heavenly cogent, wholesomely corrective, admittedly sometimes too bitter but hopefully ameliorating to the true body of Christ .  How’s that for a brand?

  2. norma jean says:

    HUH?

  3. Anthony Peterson says:

    Robert, you lost me after "I am…"

    Phil, great topic, and one that often generates interesting discussion amongst Marketing Managers.

    From a classic strategic marketing perspective, a brand should meet a need. So from that sense the need (culture?) is the chicken that comes before the egg (brand).

    Our needs continually change over time. Brands that die are brands that no longer meet a need – not necessarily brands that are old.

    "What is aging AND obsolete will soon disappear" (somewhere in Hebrews?) 

     

     

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