Does the Internet Power Atheists?

Interesting idea here.  What do you think?

This entry was posted on Thursday, June 7th, 2007 at 11:00 pm and is filed under General. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

  • http://childoftelevision.blogspot.com/ Tony Figueroa
    You can use that wide spread on radio and TV as a spring board to the Internet. 
    On a show you can tease the Internet i.e. past episodes, deleted scenes, bloopers, discussions boards, blogs & podcasts.
    This is another reason to go beyond the sermon shows. There is no reason one cannot produce content for TV and Radio and at the same time produce content for the web (Banner ads can pay for the costs).
  • Russ Casenhiser

    Two comments. First, a better question might be are Atheists doing a better job of using the internet than Christians? The internet provides a powerful toolset to Christians and Atheists alike. There is nothing about YouTube, Digg etc. that provides a unique advantage to any group. The tools are there; use them or get run over by people who are. 

    Second, the article you linked to referred to a recent Digg post titled "Murdered for being an atheist." This is a phenomenal illustration of the long tail. That post now has 3,000+ diggs and more comments than I have time to read. The interesting point? The incident happened in 2004, and the article it's talking about is from 2005. I'd be willing to bet the article is getting more web-traffic now than it did when was first published.

  • Phil

    Brilliant point.  I agree that we've got a wide spread on radio and TV, but Christians have far to go with the Internet.  Great points all around.

  • Ralph

    Everybody is looking at YouTube and other internet sites (which don't have any responsibility for their content or message bcause TV has given away their franchise to entertain as well as embed moral messages). Old Comedies like Barney Miller or Night Court entertained mass audiences while often making serious religous tolerance, social, and moral points (minus the syrup or preachy point of view that folks who are not intensively religous resent). If someone could re-invent that genre and draw a mass audience again, it would have more persuasive powers than ten televangelists. I also suspect the internet use will always increase, but a lot more people would reduce their surfing if something entertaining/moral (and not derivative) ever showed up on the major networks again. I suspect no one will try, and the internet content will mirror TV (with less responsibility)